1956 Israel MOVIE FILM POSTER Western "VERA CRUZ" Gary COOPER Burt LANCASTER

1956 Israel MOVIE FILM POSTER Western

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eBay DESCRIPTION : Here for sale is an EXCEPTIONALY RARE and ORIGINAL POSTER for the ISRAEL 1956 PREMIERE of the legendary WESTERN film "VERA CRUZ" in the small rural town of NATHANYA in ISRAEL.  Starring GARY COOPER ,  BURT LANCASTER and also SARITA MONTIEL , CESAR ROMERO , ERNEST BORGNINE and CHARLES BRONSON to name only a few. Directed by ROBERT ALDRICH . The cinema-movie hall " SHARON" , A local Israeli version of "Cinema Paradiso" was printing manualy its own posters , And thus you can be certain that this surviving copy is ONE OF ITS KIND.  Fully DATED 1956 . Text in HEBREW and ENGLISH . Please note : This is NOT a re-release poster but PREMIERE - FIRST RELEASE projection of the film , A year after after its release in 1954-55 in the USA. The ISRAELI distributors of the film have given it a quite archaic and amusing HEBREW text   . GIANT size around 24" x 38" ( Not accurate ) . Printed in red and green . Made as issued of two halves glued together in the middle. The condition is very good .  ( Pls look at scan for accurate AS IS images ) Poster will be sent rolled in a special protective rigid sealed tube. AUTHENTICITY : The POSTER is fully guaranteed ORIGINAL from 1956 , It is NOT a reproduction or a recently made reprint or an immitation , It holds a with life long GUARANTEE for its AUTHENTICITY and ORIGINALITY.   PAYMENTS : Payment method accepted : Paypal .SHIPPMENT : SHIPP worldwide via registered airmail is $ 18  . Poster will be sent rolled in a special protective rigid sealed tube. Handling within 3-5 days after payment. Estimated duration 14 days.MORE DETAILS : Vera Cruz is a 1954 American Western starring Gary Cooper and Burt Lancaster, and featuring Denise Darcel, Sara Montiel, Cesar Romero, Ernest Borgnine, Charles Bronson and Jack Elam. The movie was directed by Robert Aldrich from a story by Borden Chase. The film's amoral characters and cynical attitude toward violence (including a scene where Lancaster's character threatens to murder child hostages) were considered shocking at the time and influenced future Westerns such as The Magnificent Seven, The Professionals, Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, and the films of Sergio Leone, which often featured supporting cast members from Vera Cruz in similar roles.During the Franco-Mexican War, ex-Confederate soldier Ben Trane (Cooper) travels to Mexico seeking a job as a mercenary. He falls in with Joe Erin (Lancaster), a lethal gunslinger who heads a gang of cutthroats (including Ernest Borgnine, Jack Elam, Charles Bronson, and Archie Savage). They are recruited by Marquis Henri de Labordere (Cesar Romero) for service with the Emperor Maximilian I of Mexico (George Macready) After an almost miraculous display of shooting with a lever action model 1873 Winchester rifle, the Emperor offers them $25,000 to escort the Countess Duvarre (Denise Darcel) to the seaport city of Veracruz on the Gulf of Mexico. Trane uses a compliment to the countess to get the Emperor to double it, impressing Erin with his boldness. During a river crossing, Trane and Erin noticed that the stagecoach that the countess is traveling in is extremely heavy. Erin later discovers that the stagecoach contains six cases of gold coins. First Trane and then the countess discover him looking at the gold. The countess informs them that it is worth $3 million which is being transported to pay for troops for Maximilian's French army. They form an uneasy alliance to steal and split the gold. Unfortunately for their plans, the Marquis was listening from the shadows.Also involved in the mix is General Ramírez (Morris Ankrum) an heroic Juarista leader. He and the other Juarista leaders soon suspect that there is more to the expedition than the countess and ambush the column several times. Eventually, the rest of Erin's group also learn that something suspicious is going on and they demand to be let in on the secret. The different groups, including Juarista secret agent Nina (Sara Montiel), conspire to steal the gold for their own purposes. Alliances are formed, quickly dissolved and others are formed. A ruse is successful in getting the gold to Veracruz where the Juarista troops attack the French in a bloody battle over the ownership of the gold. Erin attempts to steal the gold for himself by getting the countess to reveal the location of the ship she had hired to transport the gold. However, Trane arrives in time to stop him. In the end, Trane and Erin face off in a showdown that concludes with Erin's death. Trane leaves the gold and walks through the dead bodies from the battle while the wives and mothers of the Juarista troops are searching for their loved ones.Cast Gary Cooper as Ben Trane Burt Lancaster as Joe Erin Denise Darcel as Countess Marie Duvarre Cesar Romero as Marquis Henri de Labordere Sara Montiel as Nina (billed as Sarita Montiel) George Macready as Emperor Maximillian Ernest Borgnine as Donnegan Morris Ankrum as General Ramírez Henry Brandon as Captain Danette Charles Bronson as Pittsburgh (as Charles Buchinsky) Jack Lambert as Charlie As stated in a written epilogue: "Vera Cruz was filmed entirely in Mexico. The producers gratefully acknowledge the friendly cooperation of the people and the government of Mexico and the contributions of the Mexican motion picture technicians, without whose aid this film would not have been possible." Probably due to the unpredictable weather in the state of Veracruz, the film was shot in the valley of Cuernavaca. Exterior shots were also filmed at Emperor Maximilian's Chapultepec Palace in Mexico City and the climax was staged at El Molino de las Flores Although the film's opening cast credits read "Introducing Sarita Montiel," she had previously starred in films in her native Spain, as well as in Mexico. In a modern interview, Hugo Friedhofer stated that the song credited onscreen, but not heard, was recorded by Tony Martin, but was dropped before the film's release. Vera Cruz was the first film to be released in the SuperScope widescreen process. Hollywood Reporter news items add Noemi Ruben, Fernando Wagner and Lucilla Gonzalez to the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Produced by Burt Lancaster's own company, Vera Cruz teams Lancaster with the venerable Gary Cooper. The story, set during the Mexican revolution of 1866, casts Cooper and Lancaster as Ben Trane and Joe Erin, two rival soldiers of fortune who team to fight for the highest bidder. The two men come to loggerheads when Trane's sweetheart Nina (Sarita Montiel) begs them to fight on the side of the rebels, while the wealthy Marquis de Labodere (Cesar Romero) implores them to offer their services to Emperor Maximillian. Though they still haven't taken sides, Trane and Erin agree to escort the aristocratic Countess Marie Duvarre (Danielle Darrieux) through hostile territory to Vera Cruz. It soon develops that the Countess is transporting a gold shipment to the Emperor's armies. Hardly the most patriotic of souls, she offers to split the gold with Trane and Erin, but they steal it for themselves instead. It takes a while (and several bloody armed confrontations) before the two protagonists do The Right Thing. While it's fun to watch Burt Lancaster try to upstage the taciturn Gary Cooper, the film's best line goes to supporting player Henry Brandon: impassively watching the loutish Lancaster wolf down his dinner and slop wine all over his blouse, Brandon says calmly "Be careful, senor. Some of it is getting in your mouth."Frank James Cooper (May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961), usually known as Gary Cooper, was an American film actor. Cooper is well remembered for his stoic, understated acting style and appearances in western, crime, comedy, and drama films which earned him numerous awards and high recognition in Hollywood and the rest of the world.Cooper's career spanned from 1925 until shortly before his death in 1961 and consisted of more than one hundred films. He received five Academy Award nominations for Best Actor, winning twice for Sergeant York and High Noon. He was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and received an Honorary Award by the Academy after his death.Decades later, the American Film Institute named Cooper among the list of fifty greatest screen legends, ranking eleventh among the males. In 2003, his performances as Will Kane in High Noon, Lou Gehrig in The Pride of the Yankees, and Alvin York in Sergeant York, made the one-hundred greatest screen characters list, all of them as heroes.Cooper was born on May 7, 1901 in Helena, Montana as one of two sons of an English immigrant couple, Alice (née Brazier, 1873–1967) and Charles Cooper (1865–1946).[1][2] His father was a farmer who later became an American lawyer and judge; his mother was a housewife and devoted mother.[3] She wanted her two sons to receive a better education than was available in Montana and arranged for the boys to attend Dunstable Grammar School in Bedfordshire, England, between 1910 and 1913.[4][1][5] Following the outbreak of World War I, Cooper's mother arranged for her sons to come back to the United States and enrolled them at Gallatin Valley High School in Bozeman, Montana.[2][6]At the age of thirteen, Cooper injured his hip in a car accident and returned to his parents' ranch near Helena to recuperate by horseback riding at the recommendation of his doctor.[7] Cooper then studied at Iowa's Grinnell College until the spring of 1924, but did not graduate. During his time at Grinnell, he had tried out, unsuccessfully, for the college's drama club.[7] He returned to Helena, managing the ranch and contributing cartoons to the local newspaper.[1] In late 1924, Cooper's father left the Montana Supreme Court bench and moved with his wife to Los Angeles.[7] Their son, unable to make a living as an editorial cartoonist in Helena, joined them, moving there that same year, reasoning that he, "would rather starve where it was warm, than to starve and freeze too".[8]Unsuccessful as an editorial cartoonist, salesman of electric signs and theatrical curtains, promoter for a local photographer, and as an applicant for newspaper work in Los Angeles, Cooper found work as an actor in 1925.[9][1] Beginning as an extra in the film industry, usually as a cowboy, he is known to have had an uncredited role in the Tom Mix's 1925 Dick Turpin.[10] The following year, he received a screen credit in the two-reeler Lightnin' Wins with actress Eileen Sedgwick as his leading lady.[11] After the release of this short film, Cooper accepted a long-term contract with Paramount Pictures.[12] And decided to adopt the name "Gary Cooper" as his professional name, following the advice of casting director Nan Collins, who felt it evoked the "rough, tough" nature of her native Gary, Indiana.[13]With help from established silent film star Clara Bow, Cooper broke through in a supporting role in the 1927 silent film Wings, the very first film to win an Academy Award for Best Picture.[14] Wings was followed up by Nevada in 1927, co-starring Thelma Todd and William Powell.[15]Cooper became a major star with the release of his first sound picture The Virginian in 1929, which features Walter Huston as the villainous Trampas.[1][2] The following year he appeared in The Spoilers with Betty Compson.[15][2] He followed this action film with Morocco (1930), starring Marlene Dietrich, in which he played a Foreign Legionnaire.[15] In 1932, Cooper appeared in Devil and the Deep along side Cary Grant, Tallulah Bankhead, and Charles Laughton.[7] The next year, Cooper was the second lead in the sophisticated Ernst Lubitsch comedy production of Noël Coward's Design for Living.[2] Appearances in A Farewell to Arms in 1932 and Mr. Deeds Goes to Town in 1936, furthered Cooper's box-office appeal.[1] He was producer David O. Selznick's first choice for the role of Rhett Butler in his 1939 epic film Gone with the Wind.[16] When Cooper turned down the role, he was passionately against it, declaring, "Gone with the Wind is going to be the biggest flop in Hollywood history. I'm glad it'll be Clark Gable who's falling flat on his nose, not me."[17] Instead, he spent 1939 playing Michael Geste in the first remake of the classic Beau Geste.[18]Alfred Hitchcock wanted him to star in Foreign Correspondent in 1940 and Saboteur in 1942, which he both refused citing a lack of interest in thrillers.[19] Cooper later acknowledged he had made a mistake in turning down the director.[20] Instead of Cooper, Hitchcock cast Joel McCrea in Foreign Correspondent.[21] In 1940, Cooper cemented his cowboy credentials in The Westerner.[7] He won his first Academy Award for Best Actor in 1942 for his performance as the title character in Sergeant York (1941).[2] It has often been rumored that Alvin York refused to authorize a movie about his life unless Cooper portrayed him. Evidence has since surfaced that the film's producer, Jesse L. Lasky, sent a telegram pleading with Cooper to take the part and signed York's name to it.[2] In 1943, Cooper worked with Ingrid Bergman in For Whom the Bell Tolls directed by Sam Wood, which earned him his third Academy Award nomination.[1] The film was based on a novel by Cooper's close friend Ernest Hemingway. Cooper and Hemingway developed a strong friendship and spent many vacations in Sun Valley, Idaho together.[22]In 1945, Cooper appeared in Along Came Jones, a Western comedy lampooning his hesitant speech and mannerisms and his own image in general. The film co-starred Loretta Young.[23] It was the only film for which Cooper received a credit as producer during his long career.[24][23] Having worked previously at the Iverson Movie Ranch in Chatsworth, Calif for the award-winning The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935), and other productions, Cooper chose the heavily filmed movie ranch as the site for the bulk of the location work for Along Came Jones and had a Western town, known as "Iverson Village" or "El Paso Street", built at the site for the film.[25][26]Cooper won his second Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Marshal Will Kane in High Noon (1952), considered one of his finest roles.[1] While ill with an ulcer and busy filming Blowing Wild in 1953 in Mexico, he wasn't present to receive his Academy Award in February; he asked John Wayne to accept it on his behalf.[27] The following year, Cooper helped to present Academy Awards by reading the list of nominees for the Best Actress award, which went to Audrey Hepburn.[28]Cooper continued to play the lead in films almost to the end of his life.[1] His later box office hits included the stark Western adventure Garden of Evil (1954) with Susan Hayward and Richard Widmark,[2] the influential Western Vera Cruz (1954) in which he guns down villain Burt Lancaster in a showdown,[29] William Wyler's Friendly Persuasion (1956),[30] in which he portrays a Quaker farmer during the American Civil War, Billy Wilder's Love in the Afternoon (1957) with Audrey Hepburn,[31] and Anthony Mann's Man of the West (1958), a hard-edged action Western with Lee J. Cobb.[32] Cooper's final motion picture was the British film, The Naked Edge (1961), made in London in the autumn of 1960.[33]Burton Stephen "Burt" Lancaster (November 2, 1913 – October 20, 1994) was an American film actor noted for his athletic physique, blue eyes, and distinctive smile (which he called "The Grin"). After initially building his career on "tough guy" roles Lancaster abandoned his "all-American" image in the late 1950s in favor of more complex and challenging roles, and came to be regarded as one of the best motion picture actors of his generation.Lancaster was nominated four times for Academy Awards and won once for his work in Elmer Gantry in 1960. He also won a Golden Globe for that performance and BAFTA Awards for The Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) and Atlantic City (1980). His production company, Hecht-Hill-Lancaster, was the most successful and innovative star-driven independent production company in Hollywood in the 1950s, making movies such as Marty (1955), Trapeze (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), and Separate Tables (1958).In 1999, the American Film Institute named Lancaster 19th among the greatest male stars of all time.[1]Lancaster was born in Manhattan, New York City, at his parents' home at 209 East 106th Street, between Second and Third Avenues, today the site of Benjamin Franklin Plaza. Lancaster was the son of Elizabeth (née Roberts) and James Henry Lancaster, who was a postman.[2] Both of his parents were Protestants of working-class origin. All of Lancaster's grandparents were Northern Irish immigrants to the U.S.; his maternal grandparents were from Belfast, and were descendants of English immigrants to Ireland.[2] The family believed themselves to be related to Frederick Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts.[citation needed] Lancaster grew up in East Harlem and spent much of his time on the streets, where he developed great interest and skill in gymnastics while attending DeWitt Clinton High School, where he was a basketball star. Before he graduated from DeWitt Clinton, his mother died of a cerebral hemorrhage. Lancaster was accepted into New York University with an athletic scholarship but subsequently dropped out.[3]Circus career and militaryAt the age of 19, Lancaster met Nick Cravat, with whom he continued to work throughout his life. Together they learned to act in local theatre productions and circus arts at Union Settlement, one of the city's oldest settlement houses.[4] They formed the acrobat duo "Lang and Cravat" in the 1930s and soon joined the Kay Brothers circus. However, in 1939, an injury forced Lancaster to give up the profession, with great regret. He, then found temporary work until 1942—first as a salesman for Marshall Fields, and then as a singing waiter in various restaurants.[5]The United States having then entered World War II, Lancaster joined the US Army and performed with the Army's Twenty-First Special Services Division, one of the military groups organized to follow the troops on the ground and provide USO entertainment to keep up morale. He served with General Mark Clark's Fifth Army in Italy from 1943–1945.[6]Film careerThough initially unenthusiastic about acting, he returned from service, auditioned for a Broadway play, and was offered a role. Although Harry Brown's A Sound of Hunting had a run of only three weeks, Lancaster's performance drew the attention of a Hollywood agent, Harold Hecht, and through him to Hal Wallis, who cast Lancaster in The Killers (1946). (Hecht and Lancaster later formed several production companies in the 1950s to give Lancaster greater creative control.) The tall, muscular actor won significant acclaim and appeared in two more films the following year. Subsequently, he played in a variety of films, especially in dramas, thrillers, and military and adventure films. In two, The Flame and the Arrow and The Crimson Pirate, a friend from his circus years, Nick Cravat, played a key supporting role, and both actors impressed audiences with their acrobatic prowess.In 1953, Lancaster played one of his best remembered roles with Deborah Kerr in From Here to Eternity. The American Film Institute acknowledged the iconic status of the scene from that film in which he and Deborah Kerr make love on a Hawaiian beach amid the crashing waves. The organization named it one of "AFI's top 100 Most Romantic Films" of all time.Lancaster won the 1960 Academy Award for Best Actor, a Golden Globe Award, and the New York Film Critics Award for his performance in Elmer Gantry.In 1966, at the age of 52, Lancaster appeared semi-nude in director Frank Perry's film, The Swimmer in what Roger Ebert called, "his finest performance."[7] Prior to working on The Swimmer, Lancaster was terrified of the water because he didn't know how to swim. In preparation for the film, the athlete took swimming lessons from UCLA swim coach, Bob Horn.[8] The film was not released until 1968 when it proved to be a commercial failure, though Lancaster remained proud of the movie and his performance.During the latter part of his career, Lancaster left adventure and acrobatic films behind and portrayed more distinguished characters. This period brought him work on several European productions, with directors such as Luchino Visconti and Bernardo Bertolucci. Lancaster sought demanding roles, and if he liked a part or a director, he was prepared to work for much lower pay than he might have earned elsewhere. He even helped to finance movies whose artistic value he believed in. He also mentored directors such as Sydney Pollack and John Frankenheimer and appeared in several television films. Lancaster's last film was Field of Dreams (1989).For his contribution to the motion picture industry, Lancaster has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6801 Hollywood Boulevard.Lancaster was an early and successful actor/producer. In 1952, Lancaster co-produced The Crimson Pirate with producer Harold Hecht (who had previously produced three Lancaster films under his own production company Norma Productions; Kiss the Blood Off My Hands (1948), The Flame and the Arrow (1950), and Ten Tall Men (1951)). In 1954, they collaborated again on His Majesty O'Keefe, with Lancaster acting and Hecht producing. The writer for this film was James Hill. The trio started a production company, originally with Hill as a silent partner, under the name "Hecht-Lancaster." The name was later extended to include all three with "Hecht-Hill-Lancaster."The "H-H-L" team impressed Hollywood with its success; as Life wrote in 1957, "[a]fter the independent production of a baker's dozen of pictures it has yet to have its first flop ... (They were also good pictures.)."[9] Together they produced the films Apache (1954), Vera Cruz (1954), Marty (1955) (which won both the Academy Award for Best Picture and the Palme d'Or award at the Cannes Film Festival), The Kentuckian (1955), Trapeze (1956), The Bachelor Party (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), Separate Tables (1958), The Devil's Disciple (1959), Take a Giant Step (1959), Summer of the Seventeenth Doll (1960), and The Unforgiven (1960). The company dissolved in 1960, but Hecht would produce two more films in which Lancaster acted, under Norma Productions, The Young Savages (1961) and Birdman of Alcatraz (1962). Twelve years later, Hecht and Lancaster produced Ulzana's Raid (1972) together.In the late 1960s, Lancaster teamed with Roland Kibbee to form "Norlan Productions" and along with "Bristol Films" produce The Scalphunters (1968), Valdez Is Coming (1971), and The Midnight Man (1974).In addition, Lancaster directed two films, The Kentuckian (1955) and The Midnight Man (1974).[10] The Midnight Man was in fact starred in, co-written, produced, and directed by Lancaster.Apart from acting in a total of seventeen films produced by Harold Hecht, Lancaster also appeared in eight films produced by Hal B. Wallis.Lancaster made seven films over the years with Kirk Douglas, including I Walk Alone (1948), Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957), The Devil's Disciple (1959), The List of Adrian Messenger (1963), Seven Days in May (1964), Victory at Entebbe (1976) and Tough Guys (1986). Additionally, the pair acted in comedy musical sketches for the 1958 and 1959 Oscar celebrations. Although perceived as a friendly collaboration, the two actors were never friends or fond of each other in real life, as was depicted in their respective biographical books.Lancaster also often asked his close friend Nick Cravat to appear in his films. They co-starred together in nine films:[11] The Flame and the Arrow (1952), Ten Tall Men (1951), The Crimson Pirate (1952), Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), The Scalphunters (1968), Valdez Is Coming (1971), Ulzana's Raid (1972), The Midnight Man (1974), and The Island of Dr. Moreau (1977).[12]Lancaster starred in three films with Deborah Kerr; From Here to Eternity, Separate Tables, and The Gypsy Moths.In addition, John Frankenheimer directed five films with Lancaster: The Young Savages (1961), Birdman of Alcatraz (1962), Seven Days in May (1964), The Train (1964), and The Gypsy Moths (1969).Among his final films, he had a small role in the 1983 British film Local Hero.Lancaster used make-up veteran Robert Schiffer in 20 credited films. Lancaster hired Schiffer on nearly all the films he produced.The centennial of Lancaster's birth was honored at New York City's Film Society of Lincoln Center in May 2013 with the screening of twelve of the actor's finest films, from The Killers of 1946 to Atlantic City in 1980.[13]Robert Burgess Aldrich (August 9, 1918 – December 5, 1983) was an American film director, writer and producer, notable for such films as Vera Cruz (film) (1954), Kiss Me Deadly (1955), The Big Knife (1955), What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962), Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964), The Flight of the Phoenix (1965), The Dirty Dozen (1967), and The Longest Yard (1974). Film critic John Patterson summarized his career in 2012: "He was a punchy, caustic, macho and pessimistic director (the end of Kiss Me Deadly is the end of the world), who depicted corruption and evil unflinchingly, and pushed limits on violence throughout his career. His aggressive and pugnacious film-making style, often crass and crude, but never less than utterly vital and alive, warrants – and will richly reward – your immediate attention."[1]Aldrich was born in Cranston, Rhode Island, the son of Lora Lawson and newspaper publisher Edward Burgess Aldrich. He was a grandson of U.S. Senator Nelson W. Aldrich and a cousin to Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller. He was educated at the Moses Brown School in Providence, and studied economics at the University of Virginia where he also was a letterman on the 1940 football team.[2] In 1941, he dropped out of college for a minor, $50-a-week clerical job at RKO Radio Pictures.[3] In doing so, he was also dropped by his family, and lost a potential stake in Chase Bank he would have inherited. Indeed, it's been said that "No American film director was born as wealthy as Aldrich—and then so thoroughly cut off from family money."[3]He quickly rose in film production as an assistant director, and worked with Jean Renoir, Abraham Polonsky, Joseph Losey and Charlie Chaplin, with the latter as an assistant on Limelight. He became a television director in the 1950s, directing his first feature film, The Big Leaguer, in 1953. Aldrich soon gained recognition as an auteur filmmaker,[3] depicting his liberal humanist thematic vision in many genres, in films such as Kiss Me Deadly (1955), today a film noir classic, The Big Knife (1955), a cinematic adaptation of Clifford Odets's play about Hollywood as a business, and Attack (1956), a World War II infantry combat film exploring how U.S. Army careerism determined who attacked and who ordered the attack. During the 1950s, Aldrich directed mostly action stories, including early films like Apache and Vera Cruz, both starred Burt Lancaster. In 1959 he was head of the jury at the 9th Berlin International Film Festival.[4]In the 1960s, he directed several commercially successful films, such as the gothic horror stories What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962), featuring Bette Davis and Joan Crawford as spiteful sisters and faded child-actresses, the follow-up Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte, with Bette Davis as a Southern woman who lives in a mansion and thinks she is going insane (both Joan Crawford and Davis were to appear, but Crawford left the film); the sexually controversial The Killing of Sister George (1968); and the war film formula template, The Dirty Dozen (1967). The success of The Dirty Dozen allowed him to establish his own film production studio for some time, but several failures forced his professional return to conventionally commercial Hollywood films. Nevertheless, his humanism is thematically evident in The Longest Yard (1974), about the rigged-game politics, and Ulzana's Raid (1972) about the post–Civil War violence against Native (and not only Native) Americans.From his marriage to Harriet Foster (1941–65), Robert Aldrich had four children, all of whom work in the film business: Adell, William, Alida and Kelly. In 1966, after divorcing Harriet, he married fashion model Sybille Siegfried.Sara Montiel (also Sarita Montiel or Saritísima; 10 March 1928 – 8 April 2013) was a Spanish singer and actress.[1] She was a much-loved and internationally known name in the Spanish-speaking movie and music industries. Montiel was born in Campo de Criptana in the region of Castile–La Mancha in 1928 as María Antonia Abad (complete name María Antonia Alejandra Vicenta Elpidia Isidora Abad Fernández). After her unprecedented international hit in Juan de Orduña's El Último Cuplé in 1957, Montiel achieved the status of mega-star in Europe and Latin America. She was the most commercially successful Spanish actress during the mid-20th century in much of the world. Miss Montiel's film Varietes was banned in Beijing in 1973. Her films El Último Cuple and La Violetera netted the highest gross revenues ever recorded for films made in the Spanish speaking movie industry during the 1950s/60s. She played the role of Antonia, the niece of Don Quixote, in the 1947 Spanish film version of Cervantes's great novel.She was portrayed in the Pedro Almodóvar film Bad Education by a male actor in drag (Gael García Bernal) as the cross-dressing character Zahara, and a film clip from one of her movies was used as well.Ernest Borgnine (/ˈbɔrɡnaɪn/; January 24, 1917 – July 8, 2012) was an American film and television actor whose career spanned more than six decades. He was an unconventional lead in many films of the 1950s, winning the Academy Award for Best Actor in 1955 for Marty. On television, he played Quinton McHale in the 1962–1966 series McHale's Navy and co-starred in the mid-1980s action series Airwolf, in addition to a wide variety of other roles. Borgnine earned an Emmy Award nomination at age 92 for his work on the series ER. He was also known for being the original voice of Mermaid Man on SpongeBob SquarePants from 1999 to 2012.Charles Bronson (born Charles Dennis Buchinsky; November 3, 1921 – August 30, 2003) was an American film and television actor.He starred in films such as Once Upon a Time in the West, The Magnificent Seven, The Dirty Dozen, The Great Escape, Rider on the Rain, The Mechanic, and the Death Wish series. He was often cast in the role of a police officer, gunfighter, or vigilante in revenge-oriented plot lines. He had long collaborations with film directors Michael Winner and J. Lee Thompson. In 1965, he was featured as Major Wolenski in Battle of the Bulge. ebay2630

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